Mixing It Up Boosts Learning

I recently read this article: The Interleaving Effect: Mixing It Up Boosts Learning.

A few interesting points were made:

Blocking involves practicing one skill at a time before the next (for example, “skill A” before “skill B” and so on, forming the pattern “AAABBBCCC”), in interleaving one mixes, or interleaves, practice on several related skills together (forming for example the pattern “ABCABCABC”).

Overall, the interleaving effect can be strong, stable, and long-lasting.

I am currently learning from Pluralsight courses. I think interleaving works nicely with Pluralsight because the modules are around 30-60 minutes, which can fit into a Pomodoro because I play the videos at 2x speed.

I also feel like I have more fun because I can take several courses at once and finish a module from each course every day. Plus I get the variety of many different subjects, and the repetition when the courses overlap.

 

Great advice from a top competitive programmer

I read this interview with competitive programmer Ahmed AlyWhy Renowned Googler Ahmed Aly Chose HackerRank and what really stood out to me was his advice:

Ahmed, what advice do you have for people who want to become great programmers like you?

Don’t try to solve harder problems unless you are really good at solving the easier ones. That means solve a lot of really easy problems (that could be hundreds), that will improve your coding skills, which should be the easiest skill to gain. Then go to little bit harder problems, and so on.

On gaining coding experience…

I think life and coding comes oftentimes comes down to my simple formula:

  • Try
  • Fail
  • Learn
  • Improve
  • Repeat

So does this mean that the working developer has gone through more trial and error than the aspiring developer, that the senior developer has gained more experience and learned from them than the junior developer?

Also how much experience can be gained indirectly vs. must be gained directly?

I don’t know the answer to any of these questions so I just focus on 2 things with coding–right action and fun:

  1. Doing the right actions that bring me closer to my goals, that improve my coding knowledge and skills
  2. Having fun as much as I can with my coding journey 🙂

I will never “arrive” as a coder, so I can only enjoy programming as much as possible and as often as possible. So far so good 🙂

Impostor Syndrome

I have written before about Dealing with Coding Insecurities including experiencing some feelings of inadequacy at work.

I have found this video to be an amazing counter to my coding insecurities: How To Fight The Programmer Impostor Syndrome?

John Sonmez explained some great points such as compare yourself to where you were one year ago, or to where you were 5 years ago. When you compare yourself to your past self, you can really see how much progress you have made.

Another great point was that if you are not feeling overwhelmed, then you are not challenging yourself enough. The goal is to get into tough situations sometimes and really grow and improve from the adversity.

Check out the video here: How To Fight The Programmer Impostor Syndrome?